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Adding web seeds?

Adding web seeds?

Post by Otus » Sun Aug 09, 2009 8:53 am

Is there a way to add a web seed to a download?

Few torrents have web seeds, but eg. Ubuntu downloads offer both http and bittorrent. When I use uTorrent on Windows, I can paste the direct download URL so downloading works even with no peers. Is there a way to do the same with Transmission?

Re: Adding web seeds?

Post by Matt_Turner » Mon Aug 10, 2009 1:16 pm

When we add a new torrent to uT and it is already exists there – uT asks if to add the trackers from it to the existing torrent.
I suggest that at the same time – uT will also add any new web seed(s) that are found in the new torrent to the existing torrent.
If you want to do it nicer – you can add two check-boxes in this question dialog – add trackers/add seeds so we can choose if to add both and any of them.

edit:
if will be nice if we can set uT to also priorities those web seeds

Transmission A Fast, Easy, and Free BitTorrent client Unanswered topics Active topics Search Adding web seeds? Adding web seeds? Post by Otus » Sun Aug 09, 2009

Database: Seeding

Introduction

Laravel includes the ability to seed your database with test data using seed classes. All seed classes are stored in the database/seeders directory. By default, a DatabaseSeeder class is defined for you. From this class, you may use the call method to run other seed classes, allowing you to control the seeding order.

Writing Seeders

To generate a seeder, execute the make:seeder Artisan command. All seeders generated by the framework will be placed in the database/seeders directory:

A seeder class only contains one method by default: run . This method is called when the db:seed Artisan command is executed. Within the run method, you may insert data into your database however you wish. You may use the query builder to manually insert data or you may use Eloquent model factories.

As an example, let’s modify the default DatabaseSeeder class and add a database insert statement to the run method:

You may type-hint any dependencies you need within the run method’s signature. They will automatically be resolved via the Laravel service container.

Using Model Factories

Of course, manually specifying the attributes for each model seed is cumbersome. Instead, you can use model factories to conveniently generate large amounts of database records. First, review the model factory documentation to learn how to define your factories.

For example, let’s create 50 users that each has one related post:

Calling Additional Seeders

Within the DatabaseSeeder class, you may use the call method to execute additional seed classes. Using the call method allows you to break up your database seeding into multiple files so that no single seeder class becomes too large. The call method accepts an array of seeder classes that should be executed:

Running Seeders

You may execute the db:seed Artisan command to seed your database. By default, the db:seed command runs the Database\Seeders\DatabaseSeeder class, which may in turn invoke other seed classes. However, you may use the –class option to specify a specific seeder class to run individually:

You may also seed your database using the migrate:fresh command in combination with the –seed option, which will drop all tables and re-run all of your migrations. This command is useful for completely re-building your database:

Forcing Seeders To Run In Production

Some seeding operations may cause you to alter or lose data. In order to protect you from running seeding commands against your production database, you will be prompted for confirmation before the seeders are executed in the production environment. To force the seeders to run without a prompt, use the –force flag:

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  • Getting Started
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  • Artisan Console
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  • Testing
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  • Laracon AU
  • Jobs
  • Certification
  • Forums
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  • Tighten
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  • Byte 5
  • A2 Design
  • ABOUT YOU
  • Cubet
  • Cyber-Duck
  • DevSquad
  • Ideil
  • Jump24
  • Romega Software
  • Become A Partner
  • Vapor
  • Forge
  • Envoyer
  • Horizon
  • Lumen
  • Nova
  • Echo
  • Valet
  • Mix
  • Spark
  • Cashier
  • Homestead
  • Dusk
  • Passport
  • Scout
  • Socialite
  • Telescope

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Database: Seeding Introduction Laravel includes the ability to seed your database with test data using seed classes. All seed classes are stored in the database/seeders directory. By default,