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PSA: Don’t Smoke Those Stems

These are crazy times, so it’s not that weird that you’re looking at your bowl of weed stems and contemplating smoking them. Waste not, want not, right?

As nice as it is to reduce waste and be resourceful, smoking stems isn’t the way to go.

If stems are all you have left, then you’ve already smoked the good stuff.

Stems contain almost no THC. What little may be in there doesn’t even come close to being enough to produce a high.

The negligible amount of THC in stems isn’t worth the unpleasant effects and risk to your lungs that come with smoking.

Inhaling smoke harms your lungs. It doesn’t matter if it’s bud, seed, tobacco, or burning wood. Toxins and carcinogens (cancer-causing agents) are released from the combustion of materials, even stems. This damages your lungs and increases your risk for cancer and heart and lung diseases.

Smoke effects aside, smoking stems can cause:

  • a raging headache
  • a sore throat
  • coughing

It’ll also taste like you’re smoking wood chips.

Some people on Reddit and other forums who admit to having smoked weed stems also reported uncomfortable gastrointestinal symptoms, like nausea and abdominal pain.

Nope. You shouldn’t smoke those either.

Marijuana seeds aren’t going to get you high no matter how many you crush and smoke. There’s just not enough THC in the seeds to produce any effects.

Lighting them up will create a lot of snap, crackle, and pop. The acrid smoke will irritate your throat and damage your lungs like other smoke. But that’s about it.

Stems and seeds aren’t worth smoking, but that doesn’t mean they’re entirely useless. You may be able to use lingering stems and seeds. Exactly what you can do with them depends on how many you have.

If you just have a few seeds kicking around, you could plant them and try growing your own stash (if you live in an area where this is permitted, of course).

Have an abundance of stems and seeds to play with? Consider eating it.

Here are some ways to make it appetizing.

Brew some stem tea

Before getting your brew on, you’ll want to bake the stems on a baking sheet in the oven for around 45 minutes at 225°F (107°C). When done, let the stems cool, and then grind them up.

Put your ground stems in a tea diffuser and let them steep in boiling water for 10 to 15 minutes. If you don’t have a diffuser, you can steep your ground stems in a pot of boiling water and then place a coffee filter over your mug and pour so it strains your brew.

Make stem butter

Who doesn’t like butter?

Just like when making tea from weed stems, you’ll want to bake your stems in the oven at 225°F (107°C) for 45 minutes and let them cool before grinding.

Place some butter in a pan and melt over low heat. Once the butter’s completely melted, add the ground stems and let simmer for around 30 minutes, stirring often.

To strain it, cheesecloth works best. Just secure the cheesecloth over a glass jar with a rubber band, and slowly pour the butter over the cloth. Let the butter cool and — voilà — stem butter!

It might be tempting to smoke all those stems that are gathering dust in your jar, but you may want to think twice before lighting up.

Can you really get high with hemp seeds?

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There is a mistaken belief that you can get high by eating hemp seeds. Indeed, hemp and marijuana belong to the same plant species (Cannabis Sativa L), but they are different strains. Hemp produces not only nutty, fatty, buttery tasting seeds, but also can it be refined into paper, textiles and clothing, biodegradable plastic (cutlery, cups, tableware), biofuel, and even construction material (hempcrete). Yes, you can build a house with it!

Still afraid?

The hemp plant is taller and thinner than the stalky marijuana plant. The main difference between the two is the production of the psychoactive compound – tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Hemp contains less than 0.3% THC, while the marijuana can be anywhere from 5% to 30% THC. Therefore, it is safe to incorporate hemp seeds into your diet. It has been a staple for many years but recently began gaining global popularity. Additionally, it is regarded as a superfood, thanks to a large number of benefits for your health.

Inconspicuously small but fully packed with essential good fatty acids (Ω-3 and Ω-6) and protein, hemp seeds can replace soybeans, thanks to nearly identical levels of protein. Hemp seeds contain all nine essential amino acids that you can only get from food. An extra benefit is the presence of fibre, especially if you consume seeds with the intact outer hulls, which subdues your appetite and helps you control your weight. The seeds are a treasure trove of vitamins (B and E) and minerals as magnesium, potassium, iron, zinc and phosphorus.

Hemp’s pleasureful taste

Tempting nutty notes with palpable pine nut nuance.

Hemp seeds are pure delight for nut aficionados. Nutty pyrazines and pyrroline, also found in coffee, dark chocolate, nut pralines, nuts, sprouted chickpea, and Parmigiano Reggiano, are responsible for the seed’s nutty flavor. Hemp seed is therefore a perfect ingredient for a fluffy mousse or a heavy brownie. You can even smell a resinous pine nut-like undertone. It is the effect of combination of the nutty molecules with woody, spicy / camphoreous, and green notes.

Comforting fatty aftertaste

Hemp seeds feature a well-rounded fatty mouthfeel. It is the favour of different acids and aldehydes, especially (E,E)-2,4-decadienal, that give extra citrusy undertones like what can be found in lime peel, lemon and kaffir lime leaves. It is present in popcorn, pumpkin seeds, and peanut oil, green olive, cooked bulgur, and stewed beef gravy as well.

Pleasant bean-like aroma

You can detect a beany flavor resulting from a combination of bell pepper-like, green, and woody molecules. You can pair it confidently with kaki, plantain, jasmine flower, tucupi, adzuki bean, pandan leaf, cucumbers, green peas, carrots or Indian Pale Ale.

There’s also a subtle hint of maple and caramel aromas, which can be linked to the semi-sweet taste of the hemp seeds

How do you eat them?

The simplest way to eat hemp seeds is to enjoy them raw in smoothies, granola, porridge, yoghurt or sauces for some added crunchiness. You can also enrich your baked goods with hemp seeds. Hemp ‘milk’ is another way to easily incorporate the nutritious seeds into your diet, and the same goes for hemp flour. As the seeds are rich in fatty acids, cold pressed hemp seeds oil is an up-and-coming product.

Although hemp leaves are less nutrient-dense than the seeds, you can eat them raw as a leafy vegetable in salads. The seeds are also suitable for sprouting.

Can you really get high with hemp seeds? share Facebook Twitter Pinterest There is a mistaken belief that you can get high by eating hemp seeds. Indeed, hemp and marijuana