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ECHIUM ‘PINK FOUNTAIN’

Description

This is possibly the most lusted-after plant in our gardens every May and June, and is a fabulous cross we made between the superb Echium wildpretii with its 1.2 metre, fat red spike and the giant blue Echium pininana. The result is a 35 centimetres wide, tapering tower of delicate pink flowers which are like a lighthouse attracting bees, butterflies and other pollinating insects. Although most plants will be pink, the odd variant colour will always appear, but all are very desirable as our bees also pollinate the many plants we grow here. so you may get the odd surprise! We respectfully point out that all of our hybrid seed, by its very nature, may produce occasional freaks and oddities. If you discover something remarkable, and are happy to do so, please send us a picture for our website.

Sowing Advice

Seeds are best sown in spring or before mid summer to enable a full season of growth and are best sown where actually needed, preferably in a well-drained and sheltered spot. Otherwise, sow seeds, covering very thinly, in early spring onto a good soil-based compost in a frost-free place. No artificial heat is needed to help germinate these seeds, just a cool, varying, background temperature, in good light. Seedlings usually appear in 2 to 3 weeks. Pot on into a gritty compost containing very little organic material before planting out as small plants in a well-drained sheltered spot, or a large container that may be taken in during the winter in severe frost. Plants usually flower 24 months after sowing and can occasionally vary in habit and flower colour as we have numerous species growing here, and very many busy bees.

ECHIUM 'PINK FOUNTAIN' SEEDS (Tower of jewels) – Plant World Seeds. This is possibly the most lusted-after plant in our gardens every May and June, and is a fabulous cross we made between the superb Echium wildpretii with its 1.2 metre, fat red spike and the giant blue Echium pininana. The result is a 35 centimetres wide, tapering tower of delicate pink flowers which are like a lighthouse attracting bees, butterflies and other pollinating insects. Although most plants will be pink, the odd variant colour will always appear, but all are very desirable as our bees also pollinate the many plants we grow here…. so you may get the odd surprise! We respectfully point out that all of our hybrid seed, by its very nature, may produce occasional freaks and oddities. If you discover something remarkable, and are happy to do so, please send us a picture for our website.

DIANTHUS ARMERIA

Description

Cute, compact rosettes, with a small footprint, bear longish stems holding multiple heads of attractively-speckled, deep pink flowers. Unlike most pinks, it will happily self-seed around the garden and will not crowd out other plants as some self-seeders do. It is native to most of Europe, from Portugal north to southern Scotland and southern Finland, and east to Ukraine and the Caucasus. Today, populations have been introduced to, and have become naturalised in New Zealand and much of North America.

Sowing Advice

For best results, sow immediately onto a good soil-based compost. Cover the seeds with fine grit or compost to approximately their own depth. They can be sown at any time, and germination can sometimes be quicker if kept at 15 to 20 degrees C. We sow most seeds in an unheated greenhouse and wait for natural germination, as many seeds have built-in dormancy mechanisms, often waiting for natural spring germination, hence giving them a full season of growth.

DIANTHUS ARMERIA SEEDS (Deptford Pink, Mountain Pink) – Plant World Seeds. Cute, compact rosettes, with a small footprint, bear longish stems holding multiple heads of attractively-speckled, deep pink flowers. Unlike most pinks, it will happily self-seed around the garden and will not crowd out other plants as some self-seeders do. It is native to most of Europe, from Portugal north to southern Scotland and southern Finland, and east to Ukraine and the Caucasus. Today, populations have been introduced to, and have become naturalised in New Zealand and much of North America.