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morning glory seeds vs hawaiian baby woodrose

Morning glory seeds vs hawaiian baby woodrose

The issue raised by the Honourable Member is much in the spotlight of Commission and Member State activity in the field of drugs at the moment. As the 2009 Annual report on the implementation of Council Decision 2005/387/JHA on the information exchange, risk assessment and control of new psychoactive substances (1) indicates, the number of new psychoactive substances that are notified by Member States is continuously increasing.

The European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) indicates that hallucinogenic plant-seeds like Ipomoea tricolour (morning glory) and Argyreia nervosa (hawaiian baby woodrose) are marketed over the Internet under the name ‘Dream flowers’. The seeds are used in the flower-production trade, but are also marketed on the Internet as ‘smart drugs’ or ‘bio-drugs’. The seeds contain the naturally occurring psychedelic D-lysergic acid amine (LSA), which is closely related to lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), which is an internationally controlled psychotropic substance under Schedule I of the 1971 United Nations Convention on Psychotropic Substances.

The regulation and control of new psychoactive substances, including those sold in so called ‘smart shops’ is primarily the competence of the Member States, in accordance with national legislation. New substances that emerge in several European countries are notified to the European Union’s Early Warning System (EWS) on new psychoactive substances, which is operated by the EMCDDA. The EWS provides a quick-response mechanism to the emergence of new psychoactive substances on the drugs market in European countries. Substances notified in the EWS can be made subject of a formal risk assessment process if deemed necessary and as adopted in the abovementioned Council Decision. On the basis of the Risk Assessment Report from the Scientific Committee of the EMCDDA, the Commission decides whether it is deemed necessary to present an initiative to the Council to make the substance subject to control measures. Such a Decision is subsequently implemented by all Member States.

The specific use of the plant seeds sold as ‘dream flowers’ has so far not been reported to the Early Warning System. However, the psychoactive substance LSA has been formally reported to the EWS by Bulgaria, Sweden and Finland and is controlled in the United Kingdom by the Misuse of Drugs Act.

The increasing emergence of new psychoactive substances, either synthetic or plant based, poses an increasing challenge for public health authorities in the Member States as the acute and/ or longer term health risks of many of these substances are often unknown, while some of these emerging substances are simply not meant to be used for human consumption.

In order to address the most recent developments in the market for new psychoactive substances, the Commission has started with an assessment of Council Decision 2005/387/JHA which is foreseen to be finalised by the end of 2010. The assessment will not only look at the implementation of the legal instrument, but also analyse the new challenges posed by the volatile market and assess which other legal measures can be undertaken to better regulate the emergence and sale of new synthetic and/ or plant-based psychoactive substances.

Morning glory seeds vs hawaiian baby woodrose The issue raised by the Honourable Member is much in the spotlight of Commission and Member State activity in the field of drugs at the moment. As

HAWAIIAN BABY WOODROSE

Argyreia nervosa, Argyreia speciosa, Baby Hawaiian Woodrose, Baby Woodrose, Bidhara, Convolvulus nervosus, Convolvulus speciosus, Elephant Climber, Elephant Creeper, Lettsomia nervosa, Liane d’Argent, Rose des Bois, Silver-Morning-Glory, Vidhara, Vriddadaru, Vridhadaru, Wood-Rose, Woolly Morning Glory.

  • Overview
  • Uses
  • Side Effects
  • Interactions
  • Dosing

Overview Information

Hawaiian baby woodrose is an ornamental plant that is related to the morning glory plant. It grows in Florida, California, and Hawaii. The seeds are used to make medicine.

Despite serious safety concerns, Hawaiian baby woodrose is used for pain relief. But its more famous use is as a hallucinogen. Internet sellers promote Hawaiian baby woodrose as a “natural LSD”.

How does it work?

There isn’t enough information to know how Hawaiian baby woodrose might work. However, some chemicals in the seeds seem to activate parts of the brain.

Uses & Effectiveness ?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Pain relief.
  • Causing sweating.
  • Other conditions.

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of Hawaiian baby woodrose for these uses.

Side Effects & Safety

Special Precautions & Warnings:

It is UNSAFE for anyone to use Hawaiian baby woodrose, but people with the following conditions are especially likely to experience unwanted side effects.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It’s UNSAFE to use Hawaiian baby woodrose if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Don’t use it.

Mental illness: Hawaiian baby woodrose has effects similar to the hallucinogen LSD. There is a concern that people with psychotic tendencies might have more severe reactions to using it.

Surgery: Hawaiian baby woodrose might affect levels of a brain chemical called serotonin. Because serotonin has powerful effects on the central nervous system and blood vessels, there are concerns that Hawaiian baby woodrose might interfere with surgery. Stop using Hawaiian baby woodrose at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions ?

Major Interaction

Do not take this combination

Medications for depression (Antidepressant drugs) interacts with HAWAIIAN BABY WOODROSE

Hawaiian baby woodrose increases a brain chemical called serotonin. Some medications for depression also increase the brain chemical serotonin. Taking Hawaiian baby woodrose along with these medications for depression might increase serotonin too much and cause serious side effects including heart problems, shivering, and anxiety. Do not take Hawaiian baby woodrose if you are taking medications for depression.
Some of these medications for depression include fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), amitriptyline (Elavil), clomipramine (Anafranil), imipramine (Tofranil), and others.

Medications for depression (MAOIs) interacts with HAWAIIAN BABY WOODROSE

Hawaiian baby woodrose increases a chemical in the brain. This chemical is called serotonin. Some medications used for depression also increase serotonin. Taking Hawaiian baby woodrose with these medications used for depression might cause there to be too much serotonin. This could cause serious side effects including heart problems, shivering, and anxiety.
Some of these medications used for depression include phenelzine (Nardil), tranylcypromine (Parnate), and others.

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

Clozapine (Clozaril) interacts with HAWAIIAN BABY WOODROSE

Clozapine (Clozaril) affects the brain. Hawaiian baby woodrose also affects the brain. Taking clozapine (Clozaril) along with Hawaiian baby woodrose might decrease the effects of Hawaiian baby woodrose.

Cyproheptadine interacts with HAWAIIAN BABY WOODROSE

Cyproheptadine can affect the brain. Hawaiian baby woodrose might also affect the brain. But cyproheptadine affects the brain differently than Hawaiian baby woodrose. Taking cyproheptadine along with Hawaiian baby woodrose might decrease the effects of Hawaiian baby woodrose.

Dextromethorphan (Robitussin DM, and others) interacts with HAWAIIAN BABY WOODROSE

Hawaiian baby woodrose can affect a brain chemical called serotonin. Dextromethorphan (Robitussin DM, others) can also affect serotonin. Taking Hawaiian baby woodrose along with dextromethorphan (Robitussin DM, others) might cause too much serotonin in the brain and serious side effects including heart problems, shivering, and anxiety. Do not take Hawaiian baby woodrose if you are taking dextromethorphan (Robitussin DM, and others).

Meperidine (Demerol) interacts with HAWAIIAN BABY WOODROSE

Hawaiian baby woodrose increases a chemical in the brain called serotonin. Meperidine (Demerol) can also increase serotonin in the brain. Taking Hawaiian baby woodrose along with meperidine (Demerol) might cause too much serotonin in the brain and serious side effects including heart problems, shivering, and anxiety.

Pentazocine (Talwin) interacts with HAWAIIAN BABY WOODROSE

Hawaiian baby woodrose increases a brain chemical called serotonin. Pentazocine (Talwin) also increases serotonin. Taking Hawaiian baby woodrose along with pentazocine (Talwin) might increase serotonin too much. This could cause serious side effects including heart problems, shivering, and anxiety. Do not take Hawaiian baby woodrose if you are taking pentazocine (Talwin).

Risperidone (Risperdal) interacts with HAWAIIAN BABY WOODROSE

Taking risperidone (Risperdal) along with Hawaiian baby woodrose might decrease the effects of Hawaiian baby woodrose.

Tramadol (Ultram) interacts with HAWAIIAN BABY WOODROSE

Tramadol (Ultram) can affect a chemical in the brain called serotonin. Hawaiian baby woodrose can also affect serotonin. Taking Hawaiian baby woodrose along with tramadol (Ultram) might cause too much serotonin in the brain and side effects including confusion, shivering, stiff muscles, and other side effects.

Dosing

The appropriate dose of Hawaiian baby woodrose depends on several factors such as the user’s age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for Hawaiian baby woodrose. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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  • Gertsch JH, Wood C. Case report: an ingestion of Hawaiian Baby Woodrose seeds associated with acute psychosis. Hawaii Med J. 2003 Jun;62(6):127, 129. View abstract.
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