Categories
BLOG

cd strain

Strain difference in the micronucleus test. The Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test

Strain difference in the micronucleus test. The Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test

  • PMID: 3343980

Abstract

The Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test, a task group of the Environmental Mutagen Society of Japan, has earlier addressed the question of sex difference as a source of variation in the micronucleus test. Strain difference, another issue in test protocols requiring urgent clarification, was selected as the subject of the second study. Male mice of strains Slc:ddY (ddY), CRJ: CD-1(ICR) (CD-1), Slc:BDF1 (BDF1), and ms:Hal (ms) were treated with 6 different chemicals chosen from various classes of micronucleus inducers: colchicine, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, ethyl methanesulfonate, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, 6-mercaptopurine, and potassium chromate. All 4 strains gave positive results with all 6 chemicals, although ms tended to show the highest responses. ddY and CD-1 were low responders, while BDF1 was intermediate between ms and the other two. Although ms seemed superior to the other strains, its high responses became manifest mostly at high dose levels. ms was not always the most sensitive strain; it responded moderately to ethyl methanesulfonate. Also the background level of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes was the highest in ms, but this did not explain the apparent high sensitivity of this strain. Despite the strain differences, it can be concluded that any of the other strains used seems to suffice as a tester for the micronucleus test.

The Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test, a task group of the Environmental Mutagen Society of Japan, has earlier addressed the question of sex difference as a source of variation in the micronucleus test. Strain difference, another issue in test protocols requiring urgent clarificati …

Strain differences in haematological response to chloramphenicol succinate in mice: implications for toxicological research

Affiliation

  • 1 MRC Toxicology Unit, Hodgkin Building, University of Leicester, PO Box 138, Lancaster Road, LE1 9HN, Leicester, UK. [email protected]
  • PMID: 11295484
  • DOI: 10.1016/s0278-6915(00)00149-6

Strain differences in haematological response to chloramphenicol succinate in mice: implications for toxicological research

  • Search in PubMed
  • Search in NLM Catalog
  • Add to Search

Authors

Affiliation

  • 1 MRC Toxicology Unit, Hodgkin Building, University of Leicester, PO Box 138, Lancaster Road, LE1 9HN, Leicester, UK. [email protected]
  • PMID: 11295484
  • DOI: 10.1016/s0278-6915(00)00149-6

Abstract

Much toxicological research continues to be done using genetically undefined “outbred” stocks of mice and rats, although the case for using isogenic strains has been made repeatedly in the literature over a period of more than two decades. Also, very few studies are conducted using more than one strain, with the result that genetic variation in response is seldom apparent to the investigator. Here we report qualitative and quantitative strain differences in the haematological response to chloramphenicol succinate (CAPS) when administered by gavage at 500-2500 mg/kg for 7 days, to four inbred strains of mouse (C3H/He, CBA/Ca, BALB/c and C57BL/6) and one outbred stock (CD-1). CAPS caused anaemia and reticulocytopenia in all mouse strains, and leucopenia in the inbred strains but not in the outbred CD-1 stock. All four inbred strains showed significant (P 9 articles

Much toxicological research continues to be done using genetically undefined "outbred" stocks of mice and rats, although the case for using isogenic strains has been made repeatedly in the literature over a period of more than two decades. Also, very few studies are conducted using more than one str …